Windham has a speeding problem. Not so much on main roads like Roosevelt Trail, Tandberg Trail or Gray Road, but the smaller back roads of Windham. I've seen it myself with cars flying down the road I live on in Windham, much faster than they should be. Windham Police know it's an issue too and now have the approval to do something about it.

According to CBS 13, Windham Police Chief Kevin Schofield says that the Maine Department of Transportation has given approval to a request by Windham Police submitted in October of 2019 to lower the speed limit on three roads in the town.

Here are the roads that may see lower speed limits.

William Knight Road

Google Maps

William Knight Road is a 1.2 mile road between Gray Road and Varney Hill Road. The current speed limit is posted as 45 miles per hour. It is approved to be lowered to 40 miles per hour.

Google Maps

Nash Road

Google Maps

Nash Road is a 3.7 mile road that runs from Windham Center Road, crosses Route 302 and ends at a private road. The current speed limit is 35 miles per hour and a section of Nash Road has been approved to be lowered to 30 mph. We're not sure what section was approved, but if I were to guess, I would say it's the section between Windham Center Road and 302 because the road is narrower, has a moderately steep hill and has a decent number of residences on it.

Google Maps

Gambo Road

Google Maps

Gambo Road is a short 0.4 mile road that runs from River Road across from Duck Pond Variety and dead ends a the Gambo Preserve. This road sees a lot of pedestrian and bicycle traffic because of the nature preserve, Gambo Fields and the nearby Mountain Division Trail. The speed limit is currently 35 mph and has been approved to be lowered to 30 mph. I think that even that's too fast and would like to see it at 25 mph.

Google Maps

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