You can blame the New York Times for our Wordle anxiety.

 

According to a study by WordFinderX cheating is at an all-time high. It's ever since the New York Times bought Wordle at the end of January. Just before the Times bought Wordle, search interest for the question 'today’s wordle' on Google was so low it registered it was a 0 for search popularity.

TownsquareMedia
TownsquareMedia
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But by February 14, people weren't searching for what to get their honey for Valentine's Day, they were looking to see what the heck the Wordle word was! Searches for Wordle answers hit 100 on Google’s scale from 0–100. It can be frustrating. I will say I haven't cheated. But I've come close.

This is awesome. Here are the key findings of the report. See if you can find the fun little fact just thrown in there:

  • SWILL and AROMA were the words players cheated for most.
  • Wordle cheaters were usually looking up the answers between 7 and 8 a.m.
  • The biggest cheaters on Wordle were from New Hampshire.

New Hampshire! Shame on you live free or die enthusiasts! You can't stand not knowing that 5 letter word can you? People think that World has gotten harder since the New York Times purchased it. There's no proof of that, but boy - our patience for not knowing the answer is shorter. Here is the graph by WordFinderX proving we are a bunch of Wordle cheaters!

WordFinder X
WordFinder X
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Aroma damn near killed me. I got it in 6. But Maine was high on the cheating list too. We came in at number 6 with the words dodge and tacit. Tacit. I got lucky on that one. Gee, maybe there is something to the words getting harder after the NY Times bought it...

 

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