We love moose!  Teddy saw his first moose while visiting New Hampshire in the fall of 2012. New Hampshire is doing a study on the moose population to see how things are going. 

Moose biologist Kristine Rines recapped the progress of the moose mortality study that got underway in northern New Hampshire in January. This is the first year of a three year study being undertaken by the New Hampshire Fish and Game Department in partnership with the University of New Hampshire. A total of 43 moose were captured and collared during the first two weeks of the study, very close to the anticipated number of 45. For this initial project work, Fish and Game contracted with a specialized helicopter wildlife crew from Aero Tech, Inc., to capture and collar moose for the study, using net-guns and tranquilizer darts. Extremely cold temperatures made the work challenging, because it affected some equipment.

. "Moose are not on the verge of disappearing from the New Hampshire landscape, but they are declining," said Rines. "Regional moose populations are facing some serious threats. We don't know what the future holds for our moose, but we’re hopeful that a combination of research and management efforts will allow us to do all we can to secure the future of New Hampshire’s invaluable moose resources."

New Hampshire Fish & Game
New Hampshire Fish & Game