Have you ever misused any of these words?

Even if you're a generally smart person, if you misuse any of these words, people who don't know you might think you're not too bright. That's why it's a good idea to review lists like this...just to make sure...

I mean, I knew the correct use off all of these...um...yeah, really...

Accept vs. Except

These two words sound similar but have very different meanings. Accept means to receive something willingly: "His mom accepted his explanation" or "She accepted the gift graciously." Except signifies exclusion: "I can attend every meeting except the one next week."

To help you remember, note that both except and exclusion begin with ex.

Affect vs. Effect

To make these words even more confusing than they already are, both can be used as either a noun or a verb.

Let's start with the verbs. Affect means to influence something or someone; effectmeans to accomplish something. "Your job was affected by the organizational restructuring" but "These changes will be effected on Monday."

As a noun, an effect is the result of something: "The sunny weather had a huge effecton sales." It's almost always the right choice because the noun affect refers to an emotional state and is rarely used outside of psychological circles: "The patient'saffect was flat."

Lie vs. Lay

We're all pretty clear on the lie that means an untruth. It's the other usage that trips us up. Lie also means to recline: "Why don't you lie down and rest?" Lay requires an object: "Lay the book on the table." Lie is something you can do by yourself, but you need an object to lay.

It's more confusing in the past tense. The past tense of lie is--you guessed it--lay: "Ilay down for an hour last night." And the past tense of lay is laid: "I laid the book on the table."

Bring vs. Take

Bring and take both describe transporting something or someone from one place to another, but the correct usage depends on the speaker's point of view. Somebodybrings something to you, but you take it to somewhere else: "Bring me the mail, thentake your shoes to your room."

Just remember, if the movement is toward you, use bring; if the movement is away from you, use take.

Ironic vs. Coincidental

A lot of people get this wrong. If you break your leg the day before a ski trip, that's notironic--it's coincidental (and bad luck).

Ironic has several meanings, all of which include some type of reversal of what was expected. Verbal irony is when a person says one thing but clearly means another. Situational irony is when a result is the opposite of what was expected. O. Henry was a master of situational irony. In "The Gift of the Magi," Jim sells his watch to buy combs for his wife's hair, and she sells her hair to buy a chain for Jim's watch. Each character sold something precious to buy a gift for the other, but those gifts were intended for what the other person sold. That is true irony.

If you break your leg the day before a ski trip, that's coincidental. If you drive up to the mountains to ski, and there was more snow back at your house, that's ironic.

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